10 Things to Do Before and After Your Wedding (Part 2)

 

Proposal Photo by ChristinaCeeLee.com

Hello there,

Thanks for joining me on Part 2 of “10 Things to Do Before and After Your Wedding.” Here are the other ten!

  1. Book your vendors and volunteers (Months 1-5)
    • Officiant: Often times, if you’re getting married at a church, there will be an official officiant for that particular church. It’s best to get married at your local church that you’re a member of so that you get pre-marital from people who know and love you.
    • Photography: Call and ask several photographers for quotes. If you’re a local to Chicago, I highly recommend Christina Cee Lee. She’s a grad from SAIC and has an amazing eye for detail, scenery, and angles. Love her!
    • Videography: Call and ask around for videos. Two vendors that I’d suggest are Henry Wu and Gravity Weddings. They have a way of making that day memorable and unforgettable.
    • Photobooth: I used Henry Wu for this one as well. My guests LOVED his booth! It was really neat and cute. Open air, and simple to use!
    • Hair/Makeup/Nails: I didn’t have that great of a hair and makeup experience, but if you’re local, check out Bliss Nail Spa in Elmhurst, IL. Maybe you’ll see me too 🙂
    • Musicians: We had some family members and local musicians do our ceremony. They did a great job! Shout out to John and AeRim!
    • DJ/Band: We hired Remix Entertainment, and they were pretty epic party starters. You want to make sure your emcees are going to create party-conducive vibes for the rest of the night!
    • Transportation: Look on Groupon for possible discounts on party buses or rentals for transport to and fro. We used M&M Limo, and they were amazing!
    • Hotel Rooms: Book a row of rooms for guests traveling from abroad, and make sure they’re comfortable while they’re here.
  2. Buy Your Wedding Bands
    • Check online, at the mall, and smaller boutiques. There are usually sales all around at different sites. We bought my engagement ring at Ritani. We also got our wedding bands off of Tiffany’s and Amazon.
    • Decide which metals look best for your skin tone and lifestyle. If you tend to work a lot with your hands (like a doctor), you may even consider getting a “wedding necklace.”
    • Bands are circular to represent the eternal love between the two, so do what’s right for you!
  3. Create a schedule and outline for the wedding day (Months 5-6)
    • There are several templates online for you to check on Google. Let me know if you’re having some questions about the day.
    • Create a contact list for all the people in the wedding and the vendors as well. This is a helpful list to grab when you need information about your contact for vendors.
    • Make sure you add song cues and when everyone walks in and out. The more details, the better!
  4. Plan the Honeymoon (Months 5-7)
    • This is another adventure in it of itself. You’ll want to check and compare different sites from Expedia to Southwest to United Airlines and hotel sites. Sometimes it’s cheaper to book things separately than a package deal.
    • We ended up booking our flights on Southwest and booking the hotel reservations through a family connection. All in all, our 6-day, all-inclusive stay and flight ended up being less than $2,500 to Cancun.
    • Also, don’t forget to pack!
  5. Send out the Invitations (Month 6)
    • At this point, your guest list should be finalized. You should also invite in rounds. List A will have to RSVP three months before the wedding. List B will have to RSVP at least two months before the wedding, and so on.
    • Decide if you’re allowing everyone a plus one. Perhaps you won’t want to celebrate with your old friend’s three-week boyfriend. It’s your wedding, you decide who comes.
    • Make sure to include your names, the date, time, ceremony address, venue address, RSVP card with food choices (unless it’s a buffet), and a date where they need to send the RSVP back. Whew, that’s a mouthful!
  6. Create a Seating Chart (Months 7)
    • Ask the event coordinator of the venue for the floor plan for the room, or create your own if it’s a DIY wedding.
    • You’ll start to create this list of guests as you get a good round of RSVPs. Make sure you’re not seating enemies with exes unless discord is your goal. Let’s make sure we have a happy wedding!
    • During the process of seating, it may also be useful to write how many of each entree the guests have ordered. This was helpful for our venue and catering at Harry Caray’s when they asked for the guest list. Here are some tips for planning the guest list.
  7. Make and Print Your Programs (Month 8)
    • There are great outlines on Etsy where you can print them out yourself. The cost of our 300 programs was around $50, for paper and the template!
  8. Follow up on all your vendors (Wedding Week)
    • Make sure you tell your wedding coordinator to follow up on all those vendors. Sometimes they get mixed up with times and dates and locations. Double check to ensure there won’t be any mishaps on your big day!
  9. Leave reviews for your vendors (Week After Wedding)
    • This one is pretty self explanatory. Let the future brides and grooms know how you thought they did. Help a sister out; write a review!
    • Be detailed if possible. If you have positive things to say, state them. Talk about the service, cleanliness, and speed. If they are negative reviews, be detailed. Tell them what they did wrong and how they can improve to better serve their future clients.
  10. Thank You Notes (During Month After Wedding)
    • This is where your signed guestbook is going to come in handy. Make sure you have the gift attendants to remind your guests to write with legibility. Have your attendants label who gave what according to numbers, linking gifts to names so you can write them proper thank yous.
    • Make sure you thank your volunteers and make sure you’re up to date on all payments for your vendors. Feel free to give tip if they were extra helpful.
    • Buy a stamp from Groupon or Etsy so that you don’t have to write your address out all your cards.
    • Hire a calligrapher to write them for you.
    • I finished all my notes within a month! I was so happy after I got them done.

Thanks for joining me onpagetwo! Let me know what you thought about the steps and how I can expand on any of the given points!

With Love,

Tabitha

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10 Things to Do Before and After Your Wedding (Part 1)

 

E-Session photo by ChristinaCeeLee.com

Hello there,

I recently received my gorgeous wedding photos from one of my favorite photographers, and it’s resulted in me thinking about the wedding. We got married about three months ago, so I figured I’d reflect about the process that took up my emotional, mental, and physical life for the 9 months after he magically proposed.

To tell you a little bit about my wedding… We got engaged on December 13th, 2014 and married on September 19th, 2015. We decided to plan it ourselves, and boy, was it a fun (and bumpy) ride!  We also received a good amount of help from our parents. My fiance at the time had already purchased a home on his own (he’s AMAZING!), so all we really worried about was getting married and furnishing the home.

Here are some things my husband and I learned along the way in planning our own wedding. I’ve complied this information from our own experience, that which I’ve heard from others, and a plethora of internet sites/blogs/articles:

  1. Small or Large Wedding? (Month 1)
    • If your parents are helping fund the wedding, chances are they may want to invite their friends and families too. Ask them for their opinion, and give them boundaries so that you two don’t get overwhelmed!
    • Choose one: Have you always imagined yourself surrounded by friends, family members, the extended family of family, the roommate’s brother’s dog walker’s cousin, and the rest of the town? Or do you want a smaller, intimate 50-100 of your closest friends and family type of wedding?
    • Choosing a number of people will help you decide what venue, what sort of decorations, and how much DIY you’ll be doing.
    • This will also allow you to choose a destination wedding or narrow down the people you actually want celebrating with you. Ladies and gentleman, it’s okay to say no and truly invite those you want walking with you for the rest of your lives.
  2. Do you want a Bridal Party? Tell them! (Months 1-2)
    • The Symmetric girl/guy: For those who are obsessed with clean lines and everything being even, consider choosing an even number of bridesmaids and groomsmen (each) so that you two will be in the middle with an even amount of people surrounding you. This is mainly done so that the pictures come out with even symmetry. I had 4 bridesmaids, and the groom had 4 groomsmen. It worked out pretty well for us!
    • The Boisterous friend: If you are miss or mister popular and have a whole crew, then just invite the whole bunch. I’ve seen plenty of weddings with more bridesmaids than groomsmen and vice versa. It’s your first (and hopefully only) wedding! Make sure you have the people who mean the most to you standing right beside you at the altar! The more the merrier!
  3. Budget, budget, budget. Did I mention budget? (Month 1)
    • Choose a budget.  Here’s a website that’ll help you calculate your budget: http://www.costofwedding.com. Just plug your zip code in, and it’ll give you an rough estimate of what you’ll set aside for the wedding.
    • Stick to your budget. As easy and simple as it sounds,  it’s not. Remember, if you don’t want to start your married life in debt, learn to make compromises early. This is a great learning experience with your future spouse! Choose what is absolutely necessary and take out the frivolous items. Focus on the details that are going to allow you to marry your best friend!
  4. Choose a Date (Month 1)
    • Are you feeling spring, summer, fall, or winter? Often times, choosing a certain season will allow for discounted vendor prices. For example, the months of October to February often have discounts (in Chicago) as the cold weather may bring about less appealing circumstances.
    • Choose the time of day: Lunch or brunch wedding receptions can often be cheaper than the night and dinner reception with dancing. Consider these things in choosing the budget, and more importantly, focusing on marrying your significant other.
    • Friday and Sunday weddings can also be less expensive than Saturday weddings. Ask the venue if they have discounted prices based on date and time.
    • Holiday weekends are great for extended parties and celebrations but also tend to be very busy for the wedding industry.  If you’re choosing a holiday like Labor Day or the 4th of July, be timely about calling and visiting venues to book your date!
  5. Book the Venue, Sooner than Later (Month 1-3)
    • The venue can typically be about 40-60% of your budget. It usually includes the room for the celebration and catering (plus tip), where you can choose from a list of suggested vendors.
    • Based on your location and #6 (the next point), book a venue. Bigger hotels often have ball rooms where they can fit anywhere from 150- 1,500! Check out hotels, restaurants, museums, banquet halls, and backyards to find the look and size you need for your guests and budget. Call them and ask for their wedding/event coordinator and ask away!
    • Room size: Look for venues based on how many they can fit comfortably into the room. Don’t choose a huge ballroom that fits 1,000, and don’t don’t do the other extreme and force 300 people in a room for 100. Be reasonable in your choice, and make room for 10-20 extra wedding crashers.
    • Visit the location. My fiance at the time had to search and visit 3-5 venues per weekend since I was working on weekends. He knew my goals for the venue, and he did a wonderful job finding the absolute perfect venue for us – Harry Caray’s!
  6. Choose a theme (Months 1-3)
    • Color: It’s usually easier to choose a theme after you’ve chosen the season. And based on the weather, pick 2-4 colors that you want as the theme of your wedding. Summer weddings might be bright and colorful whereas for a winter themed wedding, one might go for browns, reds, and metallic colors.
    • Whimsical? Romantic? Classic? Simple? Rustic? Glamorous?: Choose three words that you dream your wedding to be, and make decorative decisions based on those three words. Mine were clean, romantic, and simple, so I made sure the decorative choices followed those words. Check out the photos from my wonderful photographer at christinaceelee.com.
  7. Create a Wedding Website 
    • The Knot has great templates for making a wedding website. You may want to check them out for a simple design to your story and info.
    • AVOID the RSVP option on the Knot. (Until they update the kinks). We tried using it for our wedding in 2015, and the app would sporadically delete our RSVPed guests. It was quite uncomfortable, but fortunately, our Excel guestbook-keeping system was more thorough.
  8. Send out Save the Dates! (Months 1-3)
    • Write out the guest list. Ask your groom and families to write out their own as well (if you want them to come, that is).
    • Now that you’ve settled how many and who, send out the save the dates! Witness and I used Paperless post, but feel free to go a more traditional route by sending out snail mail! Some hire calligraphers or print out E-Session (engagement session) photos, and send them as a preview for what’s the come. Here are some adorable ideas on Pinterest.
    • Also, check out Paperless Post as they have the awesome option of seeing if people read the card and a mini RSVP of what’s to come.
  9. Do you have a Pinterest account? (Months 1-3)
    • If not, please DO SIGN UP! Some of your makeup and hair vendors will end up asking you for photos of what you want. You’ll need to have thought about it beforehand, and Pinterest is a great way to get all your ideas onto one forum!
    • Once you sign up and get one, start pinning about your dream wedding! There are so many creatives and romantics on Pinterest, that you’ll be able to organize and plan for all facets of the wedding in a one stop, colorful, and easy-access avenue.
      • Pin about these topics:
        • Dress: From A-line, to mermaids, and tulle fabric, there are so many beautiful and budget-friendly brands/designers out there! Pin as many different styles and colors, and if you’re indecisive like me, you’ll begin to a notice a pattern of what you actually want for yourself.
        • Bridesmaids: Dresses, shoes, colors, gifts, accessories, nails, and hair styles (if you’re choosing for them)
        • Your Makeup, Hair, and Nails: Different styles for what you’re expecting for on the wedding day. Make sure you take the weather/temperature into consideration. If it’s hot outside, you may not want your hair down.
        • Accessories and Shoes: Decide on if you want something more glamorous or simple. If you normally don’t wear fully studded tiaras and diamonds galore, you may not feel comfortable doing that on your wedding day.
        • Photos: Save examples for certain poses and what photos of people you need the photographer to take to help you capture that day.
        • Food and Cake: Choose examples of what you’re wanting to eat. Make sure to ask the caterer about gluten-free and vegetarian options for the specified-diet.
        • Invitations and Programs: Choose examples of different stationery. Check out Pinterest, Etsy, The Knot, and Paperless Post for ideas!
  10. Buy the dress, suit, and/or tux! (Months 2-4)
    • Based on your theme and pins, you can decide what sort of dress and suit your man will be wearing!
    • Make sure to take a trusted friend/family member when shopping for these expensive items. You’ll need other opinions, aside from the salesman’s.
    • Make sure your bridesmaids/groomsmen get theirs as well.
    • All of you will need to get your fittings done a least a month before the wedding, and then again a two weeks before the wedding.

Thanks for joining me onpagetwo! Let me know what you thought about the steps and how I can expand on any of the given points!

With Love,

Tabitha

6 Steps to Being a Successful Paraeducator

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Hello there,

For the past few days, I subbed as a paraeducator… I didn’t actually know I’d be serving in that capacity until I got to school the first day… but I’m always down for new experiences. I went to the same school for three straight days, so it was beneficial getting to know the people in the building. I got a job at the same school for next week! It pays to be present.

Here are three tips for future paraeducators:

  1. Know Your Role
    • According to Google,

      “A Paraeducator is defined as a school employee who works under the supervision of teachers or other professional practitioners. Their jobs are instructional in nature and they provide other direct services to children and youth and their families.”

    • A certificate or license can be obtained for this position, but it is not often required.
    • Know that you are support to the classroom teacher’s main objectives. You are an extension of the classroom teacher or administrator’s hands and feet.
  2. Introduce Yourself
    • Introduce yourself to the secretary, classroom teachers, and principal. Use a firm but friendly handshake. Let them know you aren’t a stranger in their classroom. If you do a good job and like the school/staff, leave a calling card in case they may need future subs.
  3. Be Willing, Present, and Ask Questions
    • From taking the job, to escorting a student to the office, be willing and available.
    • Ask the secretary and the classroom teacher about the particular students that you should be focusing on. There are usually 3-5 students that may have IEPs (Individualized Education Program) or need some more attention in addition to the main classroom teacher’s instructions. The school won’t expect you to know everything, but do your best. It’s always nice having an extra adult in the room to maintain an environment conducive to learning.
  4. Walk Around the Classroom
    • Even if he/she isn’t “your” student to focus on, do your best to help them if they seem lost. Thirty kids to one teacher can be tough ratio at times.
    • There were a couple instances when more than just “my” students needed help. In those cases, I just walked around the whole room and picked out those key students (students who have a tendency to cause distractions). I then focused on getting them to work. If the alpha male of the pack is working, the other students may also follow in turn.
  5. Be Patient and Compassionate
    • There are students who may be autistic or have issues focusing. If that’s the case, be patient and walk them through the steps. Think back to times when adult figures helped you through your problems, and pay it forward to the next generation.
    • If you don’t find yourself to be a patient or compassionate person, then I highly recommend that you reconsider your career choice. You may not belong in education, and that’s okay. There’s a place for all of us, just take some time to find yours.
  6. Follow Up With the Secretary
    • The secretary is usually the gatekeeper to the ins and outs of the school. Let him/her know how the day went and if you enjoyed it, that you’d like to return again. They may even give you another job, so make sure you make friends in high places!

Thanks again for reading and joining me onpagetwo! Let me know what you think of the list and what you’d like to add!

With Love,

Tabitha